Service-Learning Fellows Program

Presenting to Service-Learning Fellows

The Service-Learning Fellows Program is a year-long faculty development program that provides an opportunity for selected faculty members to learn best practices in service-learning and community engagement, and to integrate service-learning into their teaching, research, and public service work while becoming recognized campus leaders in service-learning pedagogy and community engagement. Since 2006, nearly 150 faculty members have participated in the Service-Learning Fellows program, representing 16 schools and colleges, 3 public service and outreach units, the Provost’s Office, and the Medical Partnership.

The program includes a $2500 fellowship award. Up to 9 Fellows are selected for each academic year in a competitive review process; applications are typically due March 20 for the following year's cohort.

The Service-Learning Fellows Program is open to UGA faculty members with an interest in service-learning in any career track, including academic tenure track, academic professionals, public service faculty, lecturers, medical school, and clinical faculty members. Previous experience in service-learning pedagogy or familiarity with service-learning or civic engagement research is not required. See the PDF below, or the listing of past Fellows for examples of the sorts of projects undertaken.

 

Selections have been made for the 2020-21 program year. Next year's applications will be available in early 2021!

 

The Office of Service-Learning continues to assess the outcomes of participation in the Service-Learning Fellows Program. Please contact Dr. Paul Matthews with questions about program outcomes.

Annual Assessments

Pre- and post-participation assessment of the Service-Learning Fellows program is carried out annually, demonstrating that participants report enhanced understanding of effective service-learning and high levels of satisfaction with the program content and structure.

Longer-Term Assessment

In Spring 2011, participants from 2006-2010 were asked to complete an additional longer-term outcomes assessment. From this longer-term outcomes assessment, past participants reported a high level of continuing involvement with service-learning research/scholarship and with teaching service-learning.

Past participants also identified benefits from their involvement, including networking with other faculty, being able to advocate for service-learning at the school/college level, being able to explain the theory and best practices of this pedagogy to their students and colleagues, and having enhanced motivation to do more service-learning.